Mounting an Iomega Home Media Network Drive 2 disk directly under Linux

My Iomega Home Media Network Drive 2 was never a great NAS. On a regular base I could not find it in the network at all and lately it’s just completely gone. Even though it gets an IP address I can hardly even PING it.
So I took out the disk, attached it to a USB adapter and tried mounting it first on Windows 10, hoping it was FAT32 or something (yes, that was very naive of me). This of course failed. I also tried out this application which marked it as an XFS filesystem but it didn’t work either.

Then I connected the disk on a Linux system using Virtualbox and strange enough there it showed up as a “Microsoft basic data” partition:

~ $ sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 931,5 GiB, 1000204886016 bytes, 1953525168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 0224F3F9-C7FA-4B76-80FA-BFF8E20C926C

Device        Start        End    Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1     65536   42008576   41943041    20G Linux RAID
/dev/sda2  42008584 1953525106 1911516523 911,5G Microsoft basic data


Disk /dev/sdb: 32 GiB, 34359738368 bytes, 67108864 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 63E153EE-04AC-49ED-9C16-3C0129DD9DAE

Device        Start      End  Sectors  Size Type
/dev/sdb1      2048  1050623  1048576  512M EFI System
/dev/sdb2   1050624 58722303 57671680 27,5G Linux filesystem
/dev/sdb3  58722304 67106815  8384512    4G Linux swap

Using lsblock I got a bit more information

~ $ lsblk -f
NAME   FSTYPE            LABEL          UUID                                 MOUNTPOINT
sda                                                                          
├─sda1 linux_raid_member                8b4bcc13-8720-6f3f-9045-2e30ddf5d519 
└─sda2 linux_raid_member hmnhd-TI1XQY:1 ff158b6d-0031-4cb3-27a2-8d0b302f7f7f 
sdb                                                                          
├─sdb1 vfat                             59E3-338D                            /boot/efi
├─sdb2 ext4                             7b6969ba-37c7-4a6c-8398-4d20133d4255 /
└─sdb3 swap                             9cf10752-2e19-4e43-a0ca-5fe5668739eb [SWAP]
sr0                                                                          

Okay, so it’s a Linux software RAID with only one disk. A bit strange for a one-disk NAS but okay; “develop it once, run it everywhere” is acceptable I guess since we all do it now with Docker.

Since mdadm wasn’t installed, I quickly installed it

sudo apt install mdadm

Now it was time to assemble the RAID. If your NAS had multiple drives, you have to add all the partitions at the end of the command.

~ $ sudo mdadm --assemble --run /dev/md0 /dev/sda2 
mdadm: /dev/md0 has been started with 1 drive.

I was quite happy but when I tried mounting it I got this:

~ $ sudo mount /dev/md0 /media/hmd/
mount: unknown filesystem type 'LVM2_member'

Okay, so it’s an LVM partition according to DuckDuckGo. Since I know nothing about LVM, I just followed this guide: http://www.linux-sxs.org/storage/fedora2ubuntu.html

~ $ sudo vgscan
  Reading all physical volumes.  This may take a while...
  Found volume group "b2ea5a9_vg" using metadata type lvm2
~ $ sudo vgchange -ay b2ea5a9_vg
  1 logical volume(s) in volume group "b2ea5a9_vg" now active
~ $ sudo lvs
 LV        VG         Attr       LSize
 lvfef6229 b2ea5a9_vg -wi-a----- 911.49g

Now I’m finally ready to mount the partition (I hope)

sudo mount /dev/b2ea5a9_vg/lvfef6229 /media/hmd -o ro

Et voila …

This might sound very stupid, but you might also just install mdadm and reboot your Linux, it might do all this stuff automatically for you. At least that’s what Linux Mint does for me right now 🙂

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